5.4. How We Used These Activities in Our Research

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1 How We Used These Activities in Our Research

After presenting suggestions for activities and guidelines, we would like to share how we used some of these activities to consult pupils about the sources and content of their sexual knowledges.

1.1 A. Sources of sexual Knowledges

Children get their sexual knowledges from various sources. Both the formal and informal settings of their lives. The video you are going to see presents some insights to these sources. The school as a formal source of knowledge has wall paintings encouraging pupils to avoid drug abuse and abstain from sex, including intergenerational sex. They also get similar information from teachers, peers, books and speakers among others. However, the pupils are exposed to these very things in their home environments. They see sex, prostitution and drug abuse. For example, in our research, Juma, a 12 year boy from School A in Tanzania, explained how smoking marijuana had made youth in his village ‘get euphoric effects which lead them into doing sex’. Binti (12 years old) and Pambo (12 years old), two girls from School C in Kenya had seen sexual intercourse live in the public spaces of their neighbourhood as a result of drug intoxication.

Binti: When they inhale these substances... they don't wait to get a room, they get any man and start having sex in public... there and then, at the point of contact. Researcher: Have you seen this? Binti: I see them... outside our house... in the football field. Especially on Saturday and Sunday the field is packed. The prostitutes, the drunkards... Researcher: It means that children have already seen sex? Binti: Children know what sex is because they see it. Dalila: It is the norm to make love in the open... even as cars pass by. They do it there and then. They do not go to hidden places, they do not fear... they have drunk and used drugs, they will not care who sees them.

Naledi, a 13 year old girl from South Africa said that children already knew about sex, ‘we see it on TV; and some of us are already doing it'. Everyday habits such as shaving and washing also pose a risk as pupils in poor communities may share razor blades, tooth brushes, and wash sponges. As you watch the video, think about

  1. What information is represented in these photos? For example, correct or incorrect knowledge, formal or informal knowledge?
  2. Which forms of information might be more powerful to boys or to girls?
  3. How can they (in-school and out-of-school knowledges) work together?
Use the player below to listen to this section:

AUDIO

How we used these tools for consultation

How we used these tools for consultation

ASKAIDS 19 How we used these tools for consultation.mp3, mm:ss,(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 19)

1.1.1 Reflection

Take some time to reflect on what you have just learned. With a colleague discuss the following questions:

  1. What are the different sources of sexual knowledges in your community?
  2. Which sources seem more powerful?

In your journal, describe what you think of the children's images of their sexual worlds. What are the challenges they face in sorting out the different and often competing forms of knowledge they encounter?

Click on 'Tool 1' in the menu to the left to see the tools we used to consult pupils about their sources of sexual knowledge.

1.2 B. Pupils' perception of the HIV/AIDS related education they receive

In many schools, HIV/AIDS education is offered through formal instructional programmes that provide young people with information on human development, emotions and relationships, self esteem, sexual health, sexual behaviour and sexual violence. Pupils are very clear about the kind of information they want and need. Please watch the video below and listen closely to what the children are saying. Watch the video below and think about what pupils think about the HIV/AIDS related education they receive.

Use the player below to listen to this section:

AUDIO

How we used these tools for consultation

How we used these tools for consultation

ASKAIDS 20 How we used these tools for consultation 2.mp3, mm:ss,(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 20)

VIDEO

Pupils' perception of HIV/AIDS education

Pupils' perception of the HIV/AIDS related education they receive

Video/ASKAIDS Sexual knowledge.m4v, http://oer.educ.cam.ac.uk/wiki/Video/ASKAIDS_Sexual_knowledge.m4v,This video is available on your memory stick in the video/ASKAIDS media folder.About this video. Duration: 02:07 (watch on YouTube, local play / download options / download from dropbox) Template:ASKAIDS acknowledgement(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 01)

1.3 C. Pupils' suggestions of the HIV/AIDS related education they want to receive

In contrast to the often practiced didactic teaching method as shown in the video above, young people have expressed that they want a comprehensive approach to HIV/AIDS education, and for their parents and teachers to talk to them about sex issues without feeling embarrassed. This approach recognises young people as worthy decision makers especially if given the opportunity to access good information. Though abstinence is desirable, the comprehensive approach to HIV/AIDS related education recognises young people's sexuality, and therefore what is imperative is to provide open knowledge and skills about sexuality issues. HIV/AIDS related education does not increase sexual activity. Pupils want the pedagogy for HIV/AIDS related education to be more active and interactive through; role plays and games, videos, opportunities to explore dilemmas, practising communication, discussions that are open and multi-ethnic, talks from outside visitors such as an AIDS patient or teenage mother, comments and suggestion boxes allowing pupils who would otherwise feel embarrassed to ask questions and give them a chance to say what they want to know. They also want to learn more about puberty and body changes, sex and relationships, peer pressure problems, same sex relationships, contraception, STI’s, HIV, pros and cons about sex, when is the right time to have sex, and where to get advice. Just from the views given above by the pupils in our study, it is possible to see that if given a chance they too can give worthwhile contribution to what HIV/AIDS education should be.

i. Please watch the video below to see the importance of role playing to make teaching more active and children more engaged in their learning

Use the player below to listen to this section:

AUDIO


Pupil suggestions

Pupil suggestions

ASKAIDS 21 Pupil suggestions.mp3, mm:ss,(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 21)

VIDEO

The importance of role play

The importance of role play for active and engaging learning

Video/ASKAIDS role play work.mov, http://oer.educ.cam.ac.uk/wiki/Video/ASKAIDS_role_play_work.mov,This video is available on your memory stick in the video/ASKAIDS media folder.About this video. Duration: 02:38 (watch on YouTube, local play / download options / download from dropbox) Template:ASKAIDS acknowledgement(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 02)

ii. Please watch the video below to see the importance of facilitating class discussion and how this supports quality group work.

Use the player below to listen to this section:

AUDIO

Facilitating class discussion

Facilitating class discussion

ASKAIDS 22 Please watch facilitating class discussion.mp3, mm:ss,(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 22)

VIDEO

The importance of facilitating class discussion

The importance of facilitating class discussion

Video/ASKAIDS facilitating class discussion.mov, http://oer.educ.cam.ac.uk/wiki/Video/ASKAIDS_facilitating_class_discussion.mov,This video is available on your memory stick in the video/ASKAIDS media folder.About this video. Duration: 04:26 (watch on YouTube, local play / download options / download from dropbox) Template:ASKAIDS acknowledgement(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 03)

1.4 D. Reflection

In your journal, reflect on your own teaching practice.

  1. To what degree does it actively involve the students?
  2. Are your lessons participatory?
  3. What are the children doing with the information you give them?
  4. How are the children demonstrating to you that they have learned the information?
  5. what do you find hard to discuss in class?
  6. How might you use indirect methods e.g. case studies or fictional young people to help stimulate discussions where participants do not feel exposed?

Find a colleague who is interested in working with you to improve your teaching practice and your classroom environment.

  1. Ask your colleague to watch you teach.
  2. Use the journal prompts above as a way of analysing your teaching practice.
  3. Trade places with your colleague, and watch her or him teach.
  4. Discuss what you have seen and what you would like to improve on.

Click on 'Tool 2' in the menu to the left to see the tools that were used to consult pupils about the sex education they want.

Use the player below to listen to this section:

AUDIO

Consultation reflection

Consultation reflection

ASKAIDS 23 Consultation reflection.mp3, mm:ss,(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 23)

2 TOOL 1: FINDING OUT YOUNG PEOPLE’S SOURCES OF KNOWLEDGE

Q. How can you (the teacher) find out from the children their sources of sexual knowledges?

Suggested activities and guiding questions - refer to the topic 'Activities for Consultation' for further guidance and choose from them as well as choosing from some of these below.

  1. Focus group discussions

i. Is there anything in your neighbourhood that has given you information on or reminded you of HIV/AIDS, drugs, and sex? If yes, please explain. o If a person or people; who are they, what did they do or say? o If an object, picture or book; what is it and what was its message?

ii. Is there anything in your school that has given you information on or reminded you of HIV/AIDS, drugs, and sex? If yes, please explain.

  • If a person, people; who are they, what did they do or say?
  • If an object, picture or book; what is it and what was its message?

iii. Of the sources you have mentioned,

  • Which is the most common source? You can rank the top 5.
  • Which source has been most influential to you? You can rank the top 5.
  1. Pupil to pupil interviews – You can use the Focus Group Discussion questions above.
  2. Drawing

i. Is there anything in your neighbourhood that has given you informationon or reminded you of HIV/AIDS, drugs, and sex? It could be a person, people, or an object. If yes, please draw it.

ii. Is there anything in your school that has given you information on or reminded you of HIV/AIDS, drugs, and sex? It could be a person, people, or an object. If yes, please draw it.

  1. Photography

i. With a camera, please take pictures of where you get information on HIV/AIDS, drugs, and sex in (1) your school (2) your home/neighbourhood.

  1. Group Survey

i. In addition to doing the activities above, make a list of all the sources of sexual knowledges that the children have suggested. Ask them to rate this by writing numbers in ascending order the most influential source of sexual knowledge.

Use the player below to listen to this section:

AUDIO

Tool 1

Tool 1

ASKAIDS 24 Tool 1.mp3, mm:ss,(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 24)

3 TOOL 2: THE HIV/AIDS EDUCATION THAT PUPILS WANT

Q. How can you (the teacher) find out from the children what sort of HIV/AIDS related education they want?

Suggested activities and guiding questions - refer to the topic 'Activities for Consultation' for further guidance and choose from them as well as choosing from some of these below.

1. Pupil to pupil interviews

i. Tell me about the AIDS education you receive at school i.e.

1. What are you taught (content)?

2. How are you taught (teaching style/pedagogy)?

ii. Can you give us an example of something you learned at school that you implemented in your life?

iii. Can you give us an example where something you learned at school clashed with what someone else told you about sex, AIDS or relationships?

iv. What can be done to improve the HIV/AIDS related education that you receive at your school?

v. What are the characteristics of AIDS education that you’d like to see in school?

2. Role plays

i. Please role play how you would like to be taught in a HIV/AIDS education class.

3. Suggestion Box

i. Please drop in the suggestion box, any comments or suggestions you may have on how the HIV/AIDS education lessons can be improved. Please do not write you name, but write your gender and age.

ii. Please drop in the suggestion box, any personal questions that you may have about HIV/AIDS, sex, puberty and body changes, relationships, conception and pregnancy, contraceptives or anything else that you may wish to know.

Use the player below to listen to this section:

AUDIO

Tool 2

Tool 2

ASKAIDS 25 Tool 2.mp3, mm:ss,(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 25)

4 TOOL 3: WORKING WITH COMMUNITY MEMBERS

Q. How can you (the teacher) find out from community members their perception of HIV/AIDS related education?

Suggested activities and guiding questions - refer to the topic 'Activities for Consultation' for further guidance and choose from them as well as choosing from some of these below.

Working Group with Pupil Representatives and Stakeholders Start by sharing with the community members one or more of the products from the children's activity from Tool 1 and 2 e.g. the children could act out one of the role plays, or you could read out to the parents some quotes from the children's Focus Group Discussion and Pupil-to-pupil interviews. The following questions can guide the ensuing discussion:

  1. What is the message from the activity?
  2. What are the children saying?
  3. What do they want?
  4. What is our role in meeting the children's needs?
  5. How can we improve our participation in our role?
Use the player below to listen to this section:

AUDIO

Tool 3

Tool 3

ASKAIDS 26 Tool 3.mp3, mm:ss,(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 26)

5 TOOL 4: WORKING WITH FELLOW TEACHERS

Q. How can you (the teacher) find out from your fellow teachers their perception of HIV/AIDS related education?

Suggested activities and guiding questions - refer to the topic 'Activities for Consultation' for further guidance and choose from them as well as choosing from some of these below.

Working Group with Pupil Representatives and Stakeholders Start by sharing with the teachers one or more of the products from the children’s activity from Tool 1 and 2 e.g. the children could act out one of the role plays, or you could read out to the teachers some quotes from the children’s Focus Group Discussion and Pupil-to-pupil interviews. The following questions can guide the ensuing discussion:

  1. What is the message from the activity?
  2. What are children saying
  3. What do they want?
  4. How can teachers effectively respond to what the children want/need?
Use the player below to listen to this section:

AUDIO

Tool 4

Tool 4

ASKAIDS 27 Tool 4.mp3, mm:ss,(Series: ASKAIDS media, episode 27)


Tools for Consultation with Young People << How We Used These Activities in Our Research >> Final reflection


ASKAIDS is a project at the Centre for Commonwealth Education